#AtoZChallenge (Unofficial) – Letter T

I wasn’t going to do this, really I wasn’t… In fact I procrastinated so much that I seem to have missed the sign up…

I encourage you to head Here to check out some of the A to Z Challenge posts.

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T is for Talit and Tzitzit

A talit is hebrew garment also called a prayer shawl. The talit was created to hold the tzitzit which are the fringes worn by Jewish people. The law regarding the wearing tzitzit is referred to in the Book of Numbers (15:37-41) “Speak to the Children of Israel and tell them to affix fringes to the corners of their garments”

The Talit is worn at prayer services particulary if one is being honored with an aliya (being called up to Torah) or is leading the congregation in prayer.

Traditionally a young man who is about to be Bar Mitzvah’d will receive a talit as a gift. Another time that a talit is given as a gift is from the bride to her husband to be…. The groom will wear said talit at their wedding. He will then be buried in said talit.

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#WeekendCoffeeShare – April 22, 2018

Good Morning everyone. Once again I feel like I’m back to feeling like I don’t really have that much exciting to write about. Not much has happened this past week and it’s been pretty mehhh.

Hope you’ll at least join me for some coffee. I’m having Toasted Pecan with Southern Butter Pecan creamer myself. There’s also the usual dark French Roast/Sumatra blend and Super Dark coffee beans available as well.

My Miss Meekah has also joined us in her favorite chair

Lately she’s had a habit of stealing my chair when I’m not in it… I think it has something to do with the nice warm blanket I’ve been using as a cover

This next week will be busier and perhaps a bit more exciting… We actually follow a different calendar than the “traditional” sighted calendar, so our Pesach is actually going to be coming up next week. This week we get to do what many would call “Spring Cleaning” to get the leavening (flour, yeast, etc) out of the house. It’s also getting to the end of the April A-to-Z Challenge. I’ll mostly be finishing up this next week, with letter “Z” going in to next week.

So, that’s pretty well it for me. Hope everyone had a great week last week and wish you all a super week ahead. Also hope you’ll take a moment and check out the Weekend Coffee Share get-together, with our host Eclectic Ali.

#AtoZChallenge (Unofficial) – Letter S

I wasn’t going to do this, really I wasn’t… In fact I procrastinated so much that I seem to have missed the sign up…

I encourage you to head Here to check out some of the A to Z Challenge posts.

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S is for Shabbat:

Shabbat is the Jewish ‘Day of Rest’. It is from the root Shin-Beit-Tav which means to cease, to end, or to rest. The weekly shabbat basically starts at sunset on Friday evening and goes till sunset on Saturday evening. There are 2 commandments associated with shabbat to remember and to observe.

There are several restrictions to Shabbat (things that are you are not allowed to do) but it is also a time of great blessing and joy.

The Shabbat before Pesach is called Shabbat HaGadol or the Great Shabbat. Yom Kippur is considered a Shabbat Shabbaton or a double shabbat.

#AtoZChallenge (Unofficial) – Letter R

I wasn’t going to do this, really I wasn’t… In fact I procrastinated so much that I seem to have missed the sign up…

I encourage you to head Here to check out some of the A to Z Challenge posts.

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R is for Rabbi:

The rabbi is part of the synagogue staff… The hebrew word “Rab” means master and the hebrew word “Rabbi” means my master. A rabbi is a jewish scholar or teacher, or a person appointed as a jewish leader.

While it is not mandatory for a rabbi to be present for a jewish service to be held, the rabbi does hold a crucial role. The rabbi, when present, often leads the services and, with in the last century, it has become customary for them to deliver the Shabbat sermon. They also officiate at certain jewish rites of passage (such as the Brit Milah and the Bar Mitzvah).

In the past, only men could be ordained as a rabbi; However, since the 1970’s, women have now begun to be ordained within non-orthodox circles. In orthodox circles, the seminaries still only accept men.

#AtoZChallenge (Unofficial) – Letter Q

I wasn’t going to do this, really I wasn’t… In fact I procrastinated so much that I seem to have missed the sign up…

I encourage you to head Here to check out some of the A to Z Challenge posts.

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Q is for Quorum:

In general the word Quorum refers to the minimum number of people needed at a meeting in order for the proceedings of said meeting to be valid.

In judaism a quorum for public prayer is called a Minyan and consists of 10 males above the age of Bar Mitzvah. In cases where there are only 9 such men available, a single boy under the age of Bar Mitzvah can be used (though the validity of this is often under debate). The boy should be above the age of 9 and should at least understand the importance of his place and the fact that he is blessing G-d.

In situations of judgement a minimum quorum of 3 is necessary and must be an odd number this is to break a tie. Grace after meals is also done with a quorum of 3 (called a Mezuman).